Font Size 
A
A

Is your pet rabbit safe?

​Owners of domestic rabbits are being encouraged to vaccinate their pet rabbit or take actions to keep them safe as a regional feral rabbit control program gets underway in northern Sydney in February.

The aim of the program is to reduce feral rabbit numbers and their impacts. In urban environments this is most effective using Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV1- K5).

Rabbits are declared a pest animal in NSW as they compete with native animals and degrade Australian native animals, plants and Endangered Ecological Communities. They are also causing public nuisance and significant damage to playing fields, public parks and private property in northern Sydney.

While RHDV1-K5 is not harmful to native animals or other domestic pets (it is species-specific), pet rabbits can be infected by contact with wild rabbits and biting insects. Since last year a new strain of RHDV1, the K5-strain, has been earmarked for release due to its improved suitability to Australian conditions, in particular the cool-wet regions of Sydney where previous strains were less effective.

Rabbit owners are encouraged to contact local vets to discuss vaccination and additional protection measures including alternate housing in mosquito-proof enclosures away from contact with wild rabbits.

The release is currently scheduled to take place in selected reserves and open space in northern Sydney from mid-February to the end of March. The release is dependent on weather conditions and therefore pet owners should maintain the vaccination program as recommended by their vet.